Untitled
ii-l:

This is my bible. Bye.

ii-l:

This is my bible. Bye.

eclectic69:

i love this„ not sure who the artist is

eclectic69:

i love this„ not sure who the artist is

Dude doesn’t let the Pigs violate his Rights, 20min***

strugglingtobeheard:

thechanelmuse:

Divided Family: Through Music, Cubans Trace Their Roots To Sierra Leone

It is often said that music has the power to bring people together. That sentiment is definitely an understatement when it comes to the Afro-Cubans community Ganga-Longoba of Perico. 

Cuba’s Ganga people have been singing the same African chants for generations, but it wasn’t until an Australian researcher took interest in the songs, that they were able to trace their chants to a remote village in Sierra Leone, 170 years after the slave trade.

“When I first filmed the Ganga-Longoba, I believed their ceremonies were a mixture of many different ethnic groups,” says historian Emma Christopher, of Sydney University. “I had no idea that a large number of Ganga songs would come from just one village. I think that’s extremely unusual,” she says.

After tracing their roots back to Sierra Leone, four Cubans made the trip to the African country to delve more into their history. Christopher captured the moment for the documentary They Are We.

"Cuba was cut off at a time when other nations in the Americas were going through black pride and fighting for some justice for what happened to their ancestors," says Dr. Christopher, who points out that the island’s 1959 revolution declared racism ‘solved’. That left a lot of Afro-Cubans adrift, not knowing how to celebrate where they came from and be proud of it," she says.

Whilst many Cubans of Spanish descent have rushed to seek out their ancestry—and passports—Afro-Cubans have been far less anxious to do the same. Organizing a reunion for the divided “family” wasn’t easy given restrictions on traveling from Cuba at the time, and limited resources. But eventually, four Cubans did make their ancestors’ voyage in reverse - to Sierra Leone.

“When I opened my mouth to sing, they just stood there staring,” Elvira Fumero recalls of her arrival in Mokpangumba. “Then it was like an explosion. They started to sing the responses, and dance with me. And I knew then that this was where the Ganga came from,” she says, smiling.

For Alfredo Duquesne, visiting Sierra Leone changed everything.

"It was as if I’d just left the previous weekend. I touched the soil and thought: ‘This is it. I’ve come back,’" he says, describing himself now as ‘at peace’. "At last I know where I come from," Alfredo says. "I’m not a stranger anymore."

Source

This made me wanna cry but like not just of sadness. This is so beautiful and wonderful.

gettingplowed:

wolfpuppy:

Admit it, you sang every bit of this…

If not,
GET OFF MAH LAWN! *shakes walker*

…I know all the fuckin words! 😂someone give me more!!!

aravenhairedmaiden:

lillabet:

menagerieofchaos:

thefreelioness:

thelandofmaps:

U.S. Imprisonment Rate Per 100,000 Residents, 1978-2012

The US incarcerates more people per capita than any other nation in the world: Approximately 1 in 100 adults or more than 2.2 million people are behind bars in the US, according to the Pew Center on the States. In addition, another 4.6 million (or a total of almost 7 million) people live under some form of correctional supervision. 
Mass incarceration is not a result of higher crime rates: The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world not because it has higher crime rates, but because it imprisons more types of criminal offenders, including non-violent and drug offenders, and keeps them in prison longer. With the exception of homicide, US crime rates are comparable to other European countries with much lower incarceration rates. 
Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts US racial minorities: Mass incarceration has had a devastating effect on blacks and Hispanics in the US. African Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person and non-white Latinos are almost three times more likely to be incarcerated, according to the Pew Center on the States. 
Incarceration hits hardest at young black and Latino men without high school education. An astounding 11 percent of black men, aged between 20 and 34, are behind bars. Much of the racial disparity is a result of the US’ war on drugs - started by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. By 1988, blacks were arrested on drug charges at five times the rate of whites. By 1996, the rate of drug admissions to state prison for black men was 13 times greater than the rate for white men. This is despite the fact that African Americans use drugs at roughly the same rate as white Americans. 
Mass incarceration is expensive: Imprisoning people is not cheap. The average cost of housing an inmate is approximately $20,000 to $30,000 per year. This price tag comes at the direct expense of public money that could be spent on public education, medical care and public assistance. And it is one reason why so many states face fiscal crises today. 
Source

Okay, not to dispute that this is wrong and the such, but since this is based on a number and not a percent, then doesn’t it make sense that as the population in the USA grows, so does the number of criminals thus the number in the jails?

Population increase doesn’t take into account the fact that the US represents 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. It’s the highest known incarceration rate in the world, surpassing China, North Korea, and Russia.
~750 prisoners per 100,000 people is a massive number.

It’s a business. And a lucrative one at that.

aravenhairedmaiden:

lillabet:

menagerieofchaos:

thefreelioness:

thelandofmaps:

U.S. Imprisonment Rate Per 100,000 Residents, 1978-2012

The US incarcerates more people per capita than any other nation in the world: Approximately 1 in 100 adults or more than 2.2 million people are behind bars in the US, according to the Pew Center on the States. In addition, another 4.6 million (or a total of almost 7 million) people live under some form of correctional supervision. 

Mass incarceration is not a result of higher crime rates: The US has the highest incarceration rate in the world not because it has higher crime rates, but because it imprisons more types of criminal offenders, including non-violent and drug offenders, and keeps them in prison longer. With the exception of homicide, US crime rates are comparable to other European countries with much lower incarceration rates. 

Mass incarceration disproportionately impacts US racial minorities: Mass incarceration has had a devastating effect on blacks and Hispanics in the US. African Americans are six times more likely to be incarcerated than a white person and non-white Latinos are almost three times more likely to be incarcerated, according to the Pew Center on the States. 

Incarceration hits hardest at young black and Latino men without high school education. An astounding 11 percent of black men, aged between 20 and 34, are behind bars. Much of the racial disparity is a result of the US’ war on drugs - started by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. By 1988, blacks were arrested on drug charges at five times the rate of whites. By 1996, the rate of drug admissions to state prison for black men was 13 times greater than the rate for white men. This is despite the fact that African Americans use drugs at roughly the same rate as white Americans. 

Mass incarceration is expensive: Imprisoning people is not cheap. The average cost of housing an inmate is approximately $20,000 to $30,000 per year. This price tag comes at the direct expense of public money that could be spent on public education, medical care and public assistance. And it is one reason why so many states face fiscal crises today. 

Source

Okay, not to dispute that this is wrong and the such, but since this is based on a number and not a percent, then doesn’t it make sense that as the population in the USA grows, so does the number of criminals thus the number in the jails?

Population increase doesn’t take into account the fact that the US represents 5% of the world’s population and 25% of the world’s prisoners. It’s the highest known incarceration rate in the world, surpassing China, North Korea, and Russia.

~750 prisoners per 100,000 people is a massive number.

It’s a business. And a lucrative one at that.

When people treat you like they don’t care, believe them.

(via missmirandaaraee)

aravenhairedmaiden:

femgineer:

"I hate double standards" no actually you’re a racist who thinks that white supremacy and racist structures don’t impact the needs of POC

yup

naturee-feels:

Young, Black and tired of your shit.

horroristheremovalofmasks:

"maybe I’m old fashioned but women shouldn’t-"  no you’re a misogynist, now please do us all a favor and shut your mouth before something stupid comes out.